about the Photographer

perspectives from award-winning photographer Mark Bealer

As a Cincinnati-based photography studio of architectural design, we visit airports, offices, construction sites, healthcare offices and sports facilities, located in major cities of the United States, to help architects and designers win architectural design awards, document project completion and also market their abilities as a professional commercial architect.

Photography found me around age 10, and it has held me accountable. The difficulty can be the distraction all of the joys inside the medium bring. 

I wasn’t always an architectural photographer, although I can say structure in my framing, has followed through my career. I actually began photography as a storyteller in the field of photojournalism…a wannabe war-photographer, who thought the appropriate launch pad was a stint in the Army. I soon realized I wasn’t really up for the gruesomeness of war, but I still craved action. When I discharged I found action –or rather photography graciously presented me- with a life as a news-photographer at newspapers. I won several Associated Press award covering SWAT teams, fire departments, heroes and villains in court, and through this I became relevant, a solid part of a news team and I experienced a lot of exceptional variety in photography.

As the wider news media slowly changed to celebrity coverage and the local news cycle focused on the who's who, I again began searching for adventure. I kicked up my feet and left the news world to go freelance/commercial. Now my "action" takes the form of logistics and details that go into multi-day architectural photo shoots. 

Mark's architectural photography has been published in Architectural Digest, Housetrends, Inspire magazine and Venue magazine. Additional clients include specialty trade magazines, building supplies catalogs and directly with architects.

Architectural photographer Studio 66 with camera

Sometimes you still have to use the black cloth to remove glare from the tilt-shift lens.

WHEN I’M WORKING ON A PROBLEM, I NEVER THINK ABOUT BEAUTY. BUT WHEN I’VE FINISHED, IF THE SOLUTION IS NOT BEAUTIFUL I KNOW IT’S WRONG.

~BUCKMINSTER FULLER



ALLIED MEMBER OF AIA CINCINNATI